Asia

India’s Pandemic is Bad, But Don’t Forget About the Farmer Protests

by Meheer CommuriImage: Gayatri Malhotra / Unsplash The recent and current media fever about India is, rightly, related to the country’s vicious yet losing battle with the covid pandemic. Headlines continue to expose the grave health crisis and its disastrous handling by the Indian government. All for good reasons too, as India’s total COVID-19 caseload … Continue reading India’s Pandemic is Bad, But Don’t Forget About the Farmer Protests

Questionable Effectivity: the Duterte Administration’s ‘War on Drugs’

by Phylicia Abary Image: Colin Davis on Unsplash An overview on the ‘War on Drugs’ During Duterte’s  presidential campaign in 2016, he claimed that one of the most rampant issues in the Philippines was the usage of illegal drugs. Duterte pledged that if he were to be elected into office, criminal activity concerning drugs would … Continue reading Questionable Effectivity: the Duterte Administration’s ‘War on Drugs’

An Aging Population: What does that Mean?

by Irina JiangImage: empty007 An Aging Population: What does that Mean? In November and December 2020, China conducted its seventh national census with early reports expected in April 2021. Though it is already May, the National Bureau of Statistics has not yet disclosed their data, and with rumours of a significant decline in working population percentage … Continue reading An Aging Population: What does that Mean?

The Consequential Vote

by Phylicia AbaryImage: Artypixall / Flickr The Republic of the Philippines is going to hold its next presidential elections on the 9th of May, 2022. With the COVID-19 pandemic, the circumstances facing the ever-nearing election is a far cry from what the nation had encountered in 2016. With the date growing closer by the day, … Continue reading The Consequential Vote

Sanctions on Military Coup: To Do or Not to Do?

by Douaa QadadiaImage: The Foreign Photographer / Flickr What’s happening in Myanmar?  On the night of February 1st, the Burmese military, under the leadership of Min Aung Hlaing, seized control of the country. They then accused the landslide victory of Aung San Suu Kyi in the recent democratic election as a fraud. She was detained, … Continue reading Sanctions on Military Coup: To Do or Not to Do?

India’s flash floods: an Inevitable Consequence of the Government’s Ignorant Environmental Practices

by Heeya FirdausImage: Uttarakhand Information Department Eight years after the devastating Kedarnath floods, the North Indian state of Uttarakhand once again finds itself battling turbulent natural disasters that are tearing through populated villages, reducing all that comes before it to rubble.  On February 7th, a violent flash flood swept through the Chamoli district of Uttarakhand. … Continue reading India’s flash floods: an Inevitable Consequence of the Government’s Ignorant Environmental Practices

The Democratic Decline in Southeast Asia

by Lindsay Wong Image: Ah Nyie / Flickr Though democracy has been heavily promoted and adopted by the majority of Western countries as well as former Western colonies, Asia’s relationship with this system of government is much more complicated. While some countries have always been hostile towards democracy, Southeast Asia has more or less made … Continue reading The Democratic Decline in Southeast Asia

Indo-Pakistani Conflict: the Underlying History of Border Armed Conflicts

by Jessie Jin Image: Tor Lundgren/Flickr In November 2020, a major exchange of gunfire occurred in the disputed region of Kashmir, marking the latest development in an ongoing series of armed clashes between India and Pakistan known as the India-Pakistan border skirmishes. The November border skirmishes have left at least 22 dead, including 11 civilians. … Continue reading Indo-Pakistani Conflict: the Underlying History of Border Armed Conflicts

Owe It to the Country: How the Philippine National Police has Forsaken the Filipino

by Phylicia Abary Image: Brandon Fike/Flickr We serve and protect. Bold words with such heavy weight and significance, used as the motto of individuals who swore oaths to serve the Filipino.  All men and women serving under the Philippine National Police (PNP) have one obligation: to ensure the safety of the masses. If anything, their … Continue reading Owe It to the Country: How the Philippine National Police has Forsaken the Filipino

Unnoticed: India is Snowballing Towards Authoritarianism

by Heeya Firdaus Image: Indian Cop/Flickr Since the BJP government came to power in 2014, India has seen an exponential increase in the arrest of dissenters. Be it comedians, authors, activists, journalists or simply students, the government has not hesitated to pursue a brutal campaign against anyone who even approaches a narrative that is remotely … Continue reading Unnoticed: India is Snowballing Towards Authoritarianism

China-Australia Trade Dispute

by Lindsay Wong Picture Credit: simon2579/Getty For the better part of 2020, China and Australia have been embroiled in a trade dispute that has altered their relationship from somewhat friendly to outright hostile. China was once Australia’s top trading partner, but this has changed because of the ongoing trade dispute which has no end in … Continue reading China-Australia Trade Dispute

Economic Growth During a Pandemic: An Oxymoron or a Reality?

by: AnonymousImage Credit: Samurai Spy Let’s play a modified game of ‘Two Truths and a Lie’, except in this version of the game, identify two lies and one truth. Statement 1: Vietnam is currently regarded as one of the most dangerous and COVID-19 case abundant countries in the world. Statement 2: Every country in Asia … Continue reading Economic Growth During a Pandemic: An Oxymoron or a Reality?

What it Means to Have a Voice: Thailand Protests

by: Anonymous Photo Credit: The Foreign Photographer All throughout history, conflicts between the ruler and the ruled have existed. Even if citizens are largely happy with policies put into place by leaders, there is almost always a percentage that is not satisfied. Oftentimes, this results in protest and civil unrest. The countries that make up … Continue reading What it Means to Have a Voice: Thailand Protests

India: Farmer Protests 2020

by Heeya Firdaus Image Source: Aniruddha Guha Sarkar Braving the harsh Delhi winter, impoverished Indian farmers are marching towards the capital in hopes of registering their protests against the oppressive Farm-Bills passed by the Narendra Modi Government in September, 2020. The Government claims that the bills make it easier for farmers to sell their produce … Continue reading India: Farmer Protests 2020

In Biden’s Lead: Filipino Immigrants and Overseas Workers in the Next Four Years

by Phylicia Abary Image Source: The Atlantic Relationship Status Updated: the Philippines and the United States of America Throughout history, the Philippines has been interlaced with foreign influence and relations, but no other country’s impact has come close to the United States’ over the past few decades. Such an affiliation and partnership only becomes more … Continue reading In Biden’s Lead: Filipino Immigrants and Overseas Workers in the Next Four Years

Tibet Deserves Its Independence From China Once and For All

by Yug Yadava Image source: Graeme Bartlett Tibet was an independent country after the fall of the Qing Dynasty in 1912 but abruptly became an “autonomous” region of China in 1951. While the Chinese say they treat Tibet with respect, there have been numerous reports of human rights violations within the region such as the … Continue reading Tibet Deserves Its Independence From China Once and For All

Omnibus Bill – Protests in Indonesia

By Raihan Woodhouse Image Credit: Bloomberg Chaos, the epitome of 2020, has engulfed the streets of every major Indonesian city across the vast archipelago. In response to economic and demographic challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and his administration implemented a 905-page omnibus legislative measure which amended more than 75 national … Continue reading Omnibus Bill – Protests in Indonesia

Patriotic Education for Chinese High Schools

by Jessie Jin Image Source: The Conversation Bravery lies equidistant of cowardness and recklessness. Truthfulness lies equidistant of self-depreciation and boastfulness. People strive to reach a balancing point between these characteristics; it’s with the delicate point of balance that ultimate productivity can be achieved. Like everything else, there is a fine line between educating youth … Continue reading Patriotic Education for Chinese High Schools

Thailand Protests

By Akina Nanayakkara  Image Credit: Aljazeera The first series of protests began on the 23rd of February 2020. Preconditions to the distrust in government are mostly rooted in Prime Minister Prayut’s five-year rule. Under the leadership of Prayut, there were substantial limitations put on citizens and their civil rights, as well as growing poverty and inequality. … Continue reading Thailand Protests

The Ongoing Japan-South Korea Political and Trade Dispute

By Lindsay Wong Image credit: The Lowy Institute Japan’s colonization of Korea in the early 20th century paved the way for decades of underlying conflict, which still has reverberations to this day. For decades, Japan and South Korea have disputed over controversial issues like comfort women, forced labor, territory, and more. Currently, the two countries … Continue reading The Ongoing Japan-South Korea Political and Trade Dispute

Cultural Differences Unveiled Through COVID-19

By Kristin Cho Image credit: Oracle The COVID-19 pandemic has a global impact socially, economically, and politically. Although countries like New Zealand, Vietnam, and Taiwan have been averaging less than 5 new cases each day, many countries still struggle with the exploding new COVID cases. With the elongated duration of the pandemic providing great numbers … Continue reading Cultural Differences Unveiled Through COVID-19

“What’s Wrong with Rehabilitation?”: How the Chinese Government is Denying a Cultural Genocide

By Joyce Li Image credit: ABC Net Currently, there are approximately a million Uighur Muslims being held in concentration camps in Xinjiang, an autonomous region located in northwest China. This is a fact backed up by satellite images, refugee testimonies, and several government data leaks, all of which prove not only the establishment of these … Continue reading “What’s Wrong with Rehabilitation?”: How the Chinese Government is Denying a Cultural Genocide